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Archive for the ‘Cambridge libraries’ Category

You can now see a 3D view of the Parker Library here:

https://www.google.com/maps/views/view/109505741265803115341/gphoto/6083737258043871170

 

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Image

CCC MS 180, f. 1r, detail

ADAM EASTON: MONK, SCHOLAR, THEOLOGIAN, DIPLOMAT AND CARDINAL

10- 11 April 2014

Parker Library, Corpus Christi College, Cambridge.

Following the success of last year’s Parker Library symposium and exhibition on Herbert of Bosham, it was decided to establish an annual event celebrating important but neglected figures in English medieval history.  Adam Easton (d.1397) is long overdue for serious scholarly attention.  The image shown here is from Easton’s copy of the De pauperie salvatoris of Richard FitzRalph, archbishop of Armagh (Parker Library MS 180).

The full conference programme and booking form are now available.

Please email the Parker Library staff if you have any questions.

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The Parker Library was turned into a party space last week when we held a book launch.  Dr Mara Kalnins, Life Fellow of the College, and formerly University Reader in Modern English Literature, is the author of The Ancient Amber Routes: Travels from Riga to Byzantium. It is part tourist guide, part travelogue, but mainly a cultural history of  the ancient amber routes and a catalogue of amber artefacts.

There is no British distributor, but the book can be purchased from The Baltic Shop for £40, inclusive of postage and packing.  Alternatively, please email Dr Kalnins, who will arrange to have a copy sent to you.

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One of the more unusual requests we have had at the Parker Library recently is for the Wilkins Room to be used as the backdrop for a photographic portrait.  Kate Peters and her photography team, Dave and Selina, arrived at Corpus with a vast array of lighting and equipment to capture a portrait of Professor Susan Rankin.  Professor Rankin has worked extensively on manuscripts in the Parker collection, and recently produced a beautiful facsimile of the Winchester Troper (CCCC MS 473). We were flattered and delighted that she chose to use the Parker as the setting for her portrait; part of a new commission celebrating the achievements of four female Fellows from Emmanuel College.  We are very much looking forward to seeing the final result!

Photography in action in the Parker Library

Kate Peters capturing Professor Rankin with the Winchester Troper

An unusal sight in the Library of a whole table set up by the make-up artist

An unusal sight in the Library of a whole table set up by the make-up artist

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Open Cambridge, an annual event, this year runs from Friday 13 – Sunday 15 September, and is an opportunity to visit places in Cambridge which are not normally accessible to the public.  The programme of events has now been published, and booking starts mid-August.

Taylor Library exterior

Taylor Library exterior

Both Taylor and Parker libraries will be taking part this year, and will be open on Friday afternoon and all day Saturday. There’s no need to book for these; just turn up!

Parker Library interior. Copyright Andrew Houston

Parker Library interior. Copyright Andrew Houston

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Suzanne Paul

Last Thursday, 16th May, was Suzanne’s last day in the Parker Library. Suzanne first started work as part of the team working on the Parker on the Web Project. Six months later, I requested to cut my hours to part-time, and Suzanne and I became joint Parker Sub-Librarians, with Suzanne continuing to work 2 days per week for the Parker on the Web project. We’ve worked together now for over 6 years, and she will be a hard act to follow.

P1000270

We wish her the best of  luck and good fortune in her new post as Medieval Manuscripts Specialist at Cambridge University Library. She will be much missed – by college staff, Parker Library readers, and by numerous visitors to the manuscript exhibitions – but most of all by her colleagues in the library.

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William StukeleyCopyright National Portrait Gallery

William Stukeley, F.R.S.
Copyright National Portrait Gallery

Almost 400 years after the death of William Stukeley there is a resurgence of interest in his life and work. Stukeley studied medicine at Corpus, and was a contemporary and friend of Stephen Hales, inventor of the ventilator. His room at Corpus was, Stukeley records, “generally hung round with Guts, stomachs, bladders, preparations of parts and drawings… I sometimes surprised the whole college with a sudden explosion; I cur’d a lad once of an ague with it by a fright”. The Parker Library has a dozen or so Stukeley manuscripts, including notebooks and drawings, bought from the Sotheby’s sale of February 1963.

Stukeley was a member of the Royal Society, Royal College of Physicians, and the re-formed      Society of Antiquaries, and numbered amongst his friends and acquaintances Hans Sloane,     Edmond Halley, and Sir Isaac Newton. He travelled far and wide, and his best known works,  Abery and Stonehenge, resulted from extensive work on the stone circles there.

Stukeley was a distant cousin of the Stucley family of Hartland Abbey in Devon, where an exhibition, “William Stukeley, Saviour of Stonehenge” opens in May.  Have a look at Lady Stucley’s blog about Hartland Abbey here.

Stukeley medals (1)In the Modern Archive here in College are two medals, one with the head of William Stukeley, on the other, a picture of Stonehenge, together with Stukeley’s death date.  Because the Corpus medals are cast, rather than struck from a die – which is unusual for the time – they may be devices from which a medal, now in the British Museum, was made.  The Corpus medals are cast, rather than struck from a die, which is unusual for that time.

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